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Faculty Resource Guide

Table of contents

Introduction

Since the passage of the ADA and the Rehabilitation Act, the rights and responsibilities of instructors have been defined through various court proceedings.  The courts have supported instructors in their decisions of what to teach, but have indicated the need for some flexibility in how they teach it.  They have also supported modifications in how student progress is measured and graded.  

It is essential that instructors and the Disability Services office work together in determining if the accommodations granted are working for the student and if there are other issues besides the disability that are affecting the student’s performance.  Columbia College is to provide access for students with disabilities but it is up to the student to be successful in the classroom.  Instructors have the following rights: 

  • To determine the curriculum for their courses
  • To determine the expectations for their courses
  • To determine student progress and assign grades
  • To apply the student code of conduct, regardless of the students’ disabilities
  • To challenge accommodations that would jeopardize the academic standards or integrity of the course
  • To collaborate with the coordinator in determining accommodations for a student when the need is an exception to what is normally considered a "reasonable" accommodation

Remember you may not: 

  • Deny an accommodation that has been determined by Disability Services.
  • Share information with other students.
  • Ask a student to identify his or her disability.

Each member of the faculty plays a central role in the implementation of accommodations to students with disabilities.  Due to the confidential nature of the information about a student’s disability, the Director of Disability Services will review all pertinent records and determine eligibility for accommodations.  However, instructors are always welcome to engage in a discussion about functional limitations of the student in the classroom.   In keeping with Columbia College’s non-discrimination policy, each faculty member should:

  • Provide an atmosphere in which all students can learn course materials.
  • Notify students that accommodations are available and are coordinated through Disability Services. A statement in the syllabus and on the first day of class would be helpful.
  • Privately discuss or communicate about accommodation requests with the student once the student has presented their Letter of Accommodation to the instructor.  A student may be elect not to use all indicated accommodations.
  • Provide accommodations in a fair and timely manner. Providing accommodations is not negotiable; the way the accommodations are provided is negotiable.
  • Contact Disabilities Services Office with questions or suggestions regarding the appropriateness of an accommodation.  (The faculty member should continue to provide the accommodation under dispute until it is set aside or modified by the Disability Services Office).
  • Grade students based upon their performance, without counting off for reasonable accommodations.
  • Refer the students who report they have a disability or who are struggling to Disability Services.
  • Provide tests to the Testing Center in a timely manner.

Disability Services does an annual assessment with students on the disability services program. The assessment indicated that some classes are very welcoming while others lack a disability-friendly climate. Student comments include:

"…some instructors act in a manner that makes me feel as if I’m a hassle or an unwanted challenge they are forced to deal with…"  

"…been very supportive, easy to work with, a pleasure to learn from…"  

"…understands accommodations and confidentiality, and what it means to treat people with disabilities with respect…"  

"…some faculty members don’t seem to care or take it seriously. I feel a bit intimidated by some faculty members regarding my discussions with them about how important it is they take my disability seriously…"  

"…I am pleased with teachers who previously emailed me regarding when and where the accommodations would be provided…"  

"…having instructors question that you even have a disability is degrading…"

Mission statement

Disability Services provides support for students with documented disabilities by advocating for equal access to all programs and services. Disability Services fosters a non-discriminatory campus climate through education and outreach to the Columbia College community.

Do you know the law?

There are two legal mandates that protect students with disabilities from discrimination and ensure that they have equal access to all aspects of college life. These laws include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 as amended 2008.  

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act states: "No otherwise qualified individual with a disability in the United States … shall, solely by reason of his or her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."  

Title II of the ADA states: "A public entity shall make reasonable modifications in policies or procedures when the modifications are necessary to avoid discrimination on the basis of disability, unless the public entity can demonstrate that making the modifications would fundamentally alter the nature of the service, program, or activity.  

Disability Services works to make sure college services are in compliance with the law. At the same time, Disability Services is available to assist instructors of students with disabilities in making sure their efforts are also consistent with the law. All instructors are encouraged to contact Disability Services at (573) 875-7626 when a question or concern arises.

Frequently asked questions:

Question:  How will I know if a student in my class has a disability?  

Answer:  For the Day program the student will bring you a Letter of Accommodation at which time their accommodations become effective.  For all Adult Higher Education programs (evening/online/nationwide) the Director of Disability Services will send the Letter of Accommodation using your Cougar email account notifying you that you have a student with a disability in your session.  It is at this point the accommodations become effective.

If you do not receive a Letter of Accommodation from a student or the Director they are not to receive accommodation.  If they tell you they have a disability then please refer them to the Disability Services Office.

Question:  Is the information regarding a student’s disability and his or her needs for academic accommodations confidential?  

Answer:  Yes! Instructors must maintain a policy of strict confidentiality about the identity of a student with a disability, the nature of the disability, and the disability-related accommodations the student requires.  

Question:  Can I ask a student to disclose his or her disability to me?  

Answer:No.  Requiring that a student disclose his or her disability to the instructor puts the college at legal risk.  Although most instructors are open to listening to students who choose to disclose their disabilities-whether such information is solicited or not- it is important that all instructors communicate respect for a student’s privacy regarding the specific nature of his or her disability.  In that vein, comments such as, “What is wrong with you?” or “You look normal to me.” are clearly inappropriate and put the college at risk as they can be interpreted as discriminatory.

Question:  Is it acceptable to ask a student who is having obvious difficulties whether he or she has a disability?  

Answer:  A direct inquiry about a possible disability is not recommended. The Americans with Disabilities Act states that a public entity may not make unnecessary inquiries into the existence of a disability.  These inquiries usually relate to hiring or pre-admission screening, but when talking with students, such inquiries should also be avoided.  A direct inquiry such as this could be considered intrusive or insensitive.  Treat a student-of-concern as any student would be treated.  Suggest a conference with the student where concerns about the quality of his or her academic work can be privately discussed.

Question:  How can I refer a student to Disability Services?  

Answer:  Making an announcement at the start of class and/or printing a statement in the syllabus referring students with disabilities to Disability Services, is the best way to make such a referral.  Instructors may also encourage students to meet individually with them to discuss their academic needs.

Question:  What happens when the student goes to Disability Services?  

Answer:  Students will be asked to complete a Request for Service Form and a Confidentiality Information Form as well as provide external documentation from a professional verifying the disability. Once the Director receives the disclosure forms an Intake Interview will be conducted between the student and Director.  If the student is eligible for services, the Director and student will arrive at “reasonable” accommodations. The student then becomes officially registered as a student with a disability.

Question:  How are instructors informed that a student is qualified to receive disability-related accommodations?  

Answer:   For Day campus, once the student is registered with Disability Services the student will pick up a Letter of Accommodation from the Director and take it to each instructor.  This Letter of Accommodation substantiates proof of the disability and identifies approved academic accommodations.  The instructor should not provide accommodations unless they have the letter.  The instructor and student should discuss the accommodations and how the accommodations will be implemented.

The Director will send a copy of the Letter of Accommodation to the instructor once the students has registered or re-registered with Disability Services.  The purpose of the copy is to let the instructor know beforehand a student with disabilities will be in their course for the current term.  If the student never gives the instructor the Letter of Accommodation then accommodations are not to be provided regardless of the copy provided by the Director.

The policy for the Adult Higher Education campuses programs varies slightly.  The student will not provide the Letter of Accommodation to the instructor but will tell the instructor they have a disability and ask if the Letter of Accommodation has been received from the Director.  If the Letter of Accommodation has not been received it is the student’s responsibility to contact the Director and request it be sent.  This process is done as soon as the student notifies the Director they are taking classes for the current session.

Question:Why do students sometime provide the Letter of Accommodation so late in the semester/session?

Answer:  Due to the confidentiality of all documents related to students with disabilities, Disability Services cannot provide notice to instructors until the student authorizes this release of information.  Students are encouraged to request letters early each semester/session. 

A student may choose to attempt a class without accommodations and to self-identify later in the process.  However, if the student opts for this approach, any grades that have been earned without the use of accommodations remain as given.

In addition, registration with Disability Services may take place at any point during the semester/session.  Once the student has provided the appropriate documentation, the accommodations can be instituted.  

Question:  Why do students have several accommodations listed but do not use all of them? 

Answer:  A student can choose which approved accommodations he/she utilizes for a class.  The Letter of Accommodation will always list all approved accommodations but when the instructor and student visit, they may choose not to use a stated accommodation (i.e. extended time on test).

For online classes, some of the approved and listed accommodations may not be applicable (i.e. note taking).

Question:  What types of disabilities will Columbia College accommodate?  

Answer: Columbia College is committed to providing equal access to education for all students with documented disabilities, as defined by the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the ADA Act of 1990 (amended 2008).  Types of disabilities include visual, hearing, medical, learning, and psychological.

Question:  What types of accommodations does Columbia College provide?  

Answer:  Accommodations are individual in nature and are decided on a case-by-case basis.  Requested accommodations must be reasonable; must not create undue burden on the College; and must be supported by adequate documentation.

Examples of accommodations include but are not limited to note taking, extended-time testing, tape recording, enlargements of handouts etc.  The instructor is not expected to provide personal services for students.  If an instructor has a question about an accommodation he or she is encouraged to call the Director for Disability Services.

Question:  A student with a disability has requested to take an exam at the Testing Center. How does the instructor know the exam will be safe and the student will not get an unfair advantage?  

Answer:    The Testing Center has developed a systematic and secure procedure for getting exams from the instructor and returning the exam back to the instructor once the student has taken the exam.   All tests are kept in a locked file.  Students are required to put all materials into lockers before entering the testing rooms.  Students are told to use the restroom before they start testing.  As students test, they are monitored.  The Testing Center has a video monitoring system.

Any inappropriate behaviors or misuse of exam materials are reported back to the instructor.  Cheating is not tolerated.

Question:  Why should I fill out and return the Proctor Test Form for each test?  

Answer: By filling out the Proctor Test Form the instructor is ensuring the student taking the exam is testing the same as other students from the instructor’s classroom.  The proctors do not know if the student should get 50 minutes or 10 minutes for the exam unless the instructor fills out the sheet.  The proctor does not know if students can use notes or books, if the Proctor Test Form is not completed.  The Proctor Test Form facilitates scheduling of the exam, ensures appropriate accommodations are provided and instructor’s directions are followed. 

Question:  Can I opt to proctor the test for the student with a disability instead of sending them to the Testing Center?  

Answer:  Yes, but the instructor must provide the same accommodations the Testing Center would provide.  If the student is to get time and a half, then the instructor must allow the time and a half.  If the student is to test in a distraction reduced environment, then the instructor must have the student test in a room where there are minimal distractions.   Testing the student with the rest of the class is not providing a minimal distraction environment.  The instructor who fails to provide the specific accommodation is out of compliance.   The student would have the right to file a grievance against the instructor.

Question:  Does it make a difference what textbook I use and when I choose it?  

Answer:  Yes!  Students qualifying for alternative texts must purchase the textbook but the Director must get the book in an alternative format.   When instructors use books that come from small publishing companies, it is sometimes impossible to get the book in an alternative format. As a result, the book must be scanned for the student and put in an alternative format.  This takes considerable time and planning.  Therefore, having the book and the publisher identified as early as possible expedites getting the book for the student.

Question:  I have a student who requires a note taker as one of his or her accommodations.   What should I do?  

Answer:  Disability Services will give students the option of using Smart Pens for note taking or using the traditional method (using notes from a student in class) for note taking as an accommodation. 

Smart pens allow students to take notes in addition to recording class lectures.  Students tap the pen at a certain point where the notes are sketchy and the recorded lecture will play back. The student can fill in the blanks for their notes.  Students have special notebooks to use with the pen.  The pen also has a USB port so the notes can then be downloaded to a computer.  If needed, the computer reads the notes back to the student.

For students who are not comfortable using Smart Pens but are to receive a note taker, it is the instructor’s responsibility to find a student who is willing to take notes.  The instructor should get the notes to the student with a disability.  If a note taker cannot be identified, the instructor should provide his/her notes to the student. The student with a disability receiving the notes should not be identified to anyone (including the note taker) other than the instructor.  If the student is absent, he or she is not to get notes unless the absence is due to the disability, however, the student should clear this absence with the instructor.

Question: Do I have the right to not allow one of my class lectures to be recorded?  

Answer: No. If the student has recording as one of his or her accommodations you must allow it.  All students who qualify for recording of lecture must sign an agreement with Disability Services saying they understand that tape recorded lectures are for their personal use only.  They have to agree not to release the recordings or transcripts of the material to any other person.  By agreeing to these stipulations, no copyright violation is committed. 

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap) in the HEW Regulations 104.44 (b) states:  “A recipient to which this subpart applies (Columbia College), may not impose upon handicapped students other rules such as prohibition of tape recorders in classrooms…that have the effect of limiting the participation of handicapped students in the recipient’s (Columbia College) education program or activity.”

Question:  Am I required to lower the standards of a required assignment because the student has a disability?  

Answer: No.  Standards should be the same for all students; however, students with disabilities may exhibit their knowledge, production and other course expectations differently than their peers.  For example, a student with a learning disability in writing may complete an essay exam by using a computer or scribe, pursuant to their accommodation.  The quality of work should be the same.

Question:  I have a student with a disability who is behind in his or her schoolwork. This student has missed a number of classes, has not handed in several assignments and is not passing the class. Do I have the right to fail this student?  

Answer:Yes.  The student with a disability must complete all class work as assigned for everyone in their class.  The work of this student should be equivalent to his/her peers.   Instructors are asked to work with this student the same as they would any other student experiencing difficulties.

Question:  Do I have any recourse if I disagree with the requested accommodations?  

Answer: To clarify any disagreement with a requested accommodation the instructor should first contact the Director for Disability Services at (573) 875-7626.  If the instructor is not satisfied with the decision of the Director he or she should contact the Dean for Student Affairs at (573) 875-7401.

Question:  Is Columbia College allowed to refuse to admit a student with disabilities into a specific academic program based on the cost of providing required accommodations and/or the extra instructor time required to implement the student’s accommodation?  

Answer:  Students with disabilities need to meet the same admissions requirements as all other students to the College.  If the student with the disability meets the same requirements as other applicants and is otherwise qualified, then any disability-related concerns cannot be taken into consideration.

Question:  Do I have to continue providing an accommodation when the student does not make good faith and effort on his or her part in accessing the accommodation?  

Answer:  Yes.  Students are required the accommodation by law, and instructors would be in violation if they did not provide them.  If the instructor feels the student is not doing his or her part arrange a conference immediately with the student to work out the problem.  If it continues to be a problem contact the Director.

Question:  A student came in the sixth week of the term requesting accommodations. I feel arrangements should be made at the beginning of the semester/session. I told all students needing accommodations at the beginning of the semester/session to meet with me about accommodations. Do I have to provide accommodations for someone this late?  

Answer:  Yes. There could be numerous reasons why a student makes a late request.Perhaps he or she had difficulties obtaining the proper documentation regarding his or her disability and, therefore, could not initiate accommodations earlier.  Some students try to take a class without accommodations but find they are not doing well and need accommodations. Whatever the reason, students may make requests for accommodations any time during the semester/session. The coordinator encourages students with a disability to register or re-register as early in the semester/session as possible so they can start the class with their accommodations. 

Question:  What if the student requests accommodations after the fact? 

Answer:  Accommodations are not retroactive. If a student starts the class and takes a test prior to providing the instructor the Letter of Accommodation, the instructor does not have to go back and let the student re-test using extended time, etc.                                                                                         

This section of Questions and Answers was adapted from many sources in order to address the policies of Disability Services at Columbia College.

Policies

Alternative Testing Policy (Main Campus only)

Providing out-of-class testing accommodations requires substantial scheduling and proactive planning in order to effectively meet the testing demands and to fulfill responsibilities that extend beyond exam schedules.  Therefore, it is imperative that any student planning to schedule an exam with the Testing Center do so in accordance with the policy set forth below.

Late requests can impact the operations of the Testing Center.   Students who fail to submit the Test Accommodation Form in a timely manner will not be granted accommodations through the Testing Center.  Students who are not granted accommodations through the center due to late submission or failure to submit a Test Accommodation Form must make testing arrangements with the course instructor.  Students who do not follow steps set forth in this policy may sacrifice the opportunity to use the accommodation in a specific situation.

Testing policy procedure:

  1. If your instructor cannot make test arrangements for you and prefers for you to go through the Testing Center, you will need to request a Test Accommodation Form from Disability Service.
  2. The Test Accommodation Form must be filled out for each test and returned to the Testing Center five business days prior to the test date in order to arrange test-taking accommodations. 
    • If your test dates change you must notify the Testing Center as soon as possible. 
    • Rationale for last minute requests will be verified with the course instructor by the Testing Center staff before accommodations will be granted. 
    • It may be the case that last minute accommodation requests or testing outside of the classroom will need to be implemented by the course instructor and not the Testing Center.
  3. Failure to appear for a scheduled testing time will result in the student being referred back to the instructor of the course.  Testing accommodations will be provided only if the student contacts the instructor and the instructor notifies the Testing Center that it is ok for the student to test, otherwise testing accommodations will be forfeited for the exam in question. 
  4. The Test Accommodation Form must be completed by the student and the instructor prior to submitting the form to the Testing Center.  Students are encouraged to submit all of your dates at one time as provided in the course syllabus.
  5. Once the Testing Center receives the Test Accommodation Form, the instructor will receive an email from the Testing Center staff providing instructions on when and where to deliver the test.  It is the responsibility of the student to check with the Testing Center to verify the location of the test prior to the testing time.
  6. The Testing Center will not have your test if you do not give sufficient notice that you are taking a test.  It is your responsibility:
    • To contact your instructor and inform him or her of testing accommodations.
    • Submit the Test Accommodation Form  for signature
    • Return the completed to the Testing Center five (5) business days prior to test date.  Exams cannot be scheduled if this process is not followed.
  7. The Testing Center staff will proctor and schedule all tests.
  8. Students must submit the Test Accommodation Forms for final exams no later than two weeks prior to finals starting.
  9. Testing process:

    1. Students will report to the Testing Center for all tests.
    2. Students will be asked to give all materials to the proctor including cell phones once they enter the testing room.
    3. It is recommended that students use the restroom facility prior to coming to the testing room.
    4. Students who are tardy for a scheduled exam and have not notified the test proctor in advance, shall have their examination time shortened reflecting their tardiness.
    5. Any student attempting to cheat or found cheating on an exam will relinquish the test to the proctor, be reported to the instructor of the course, and be subject to disciplinary action pursuant to Academic Misconduct Procedures outlined in the Columbia College Academic Catalog. Cheating is not tolerated!
    6. Confidentiality of Information Policy

      Disability Services is committed to ensuring that all information and communication pertaining to a student’s disability is maintained as confidential as required or permitted by law.

      • The following guidelines about the treatment of such information have been adopted by Disability Services.  Any information regarding a disability is considered confidential and will be shared only with others within the college who have legitimate educational interest.
      • This information is protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
      • Sensitive information in Disability Services student files will not be released except in accordance with federal and state laws.
      • A student’s file may be released pursuant to a court order or a subpoena.
      • If a student wishes to have information about his/her disability shared with others outside the College, the student must provide written authorization to the Director of Disability Services to release the information.  Before giving such authorization, the student should understand the purpose of the release and to whom the information is being released.  The student should also understand that there may be occasions when the Director will share information regarding the student’s disability at his/her discretion if circumstances necessitate the sharing of information and the Director has determined that there is an appropriate legitimate educational interest involved.
      • A student has the right to review his/her own Disability Services file with reasonable notification.

      Equal Access Policy

      Columbia College is fully committed to complying with all requirements under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (as amended). Columbia College is committed to a policy of ensuring that all qualified students with disabilities have full access to programs, activities and services and those students are provided opportunities, academic adjustments, auxiliary aids and services to ensure there is no discrimination on the basis of disability. Columbia College recognizes the policy on equal access is an institutional policy and it is the responsibility of all staff, faculty and students to adhere to the philosophy of equal access.

      Columbia College Student ADA/Section 504 Grievance Policy

      Introduction

      The College is committed to nondiscrimination, equal opportunity and equal access. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, (“ADA”) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, (“Section 504”), applicable state and local law, and the College’s Policy on Reasonable Accommodations for Students with Disabilities, the College provides qualified students with disabilities access to institutional programs, activities and services and provides reasonable accommodations, auxiliary aids and services, as appropriate, to ensure equal access to all of the College’s programs and activities. Students seeking accommodations are encouraged to contact the College’s Disability Services Office during the enrollment process, or otherwise as soon as possible, to begin the reasonable accommodation process.

      Purpose

      Any College student who believes he or she has been subject to discrimination and/or harassment on the basis of disability, has been retaliated against, believes he or she has been wrongfully denied reasonable accommodation(s) by the College, believes the College failed to provide approved reasonable accommodation(s), or has other disability or accommodation related concerns should follow the steps set forth in this policy.

      The College will undertake efforts to keep confidential information obtained during the grievance process set forth in this policy, however the sharing of some information internally at the College with individuals involved who need to know may be necessary to fully investigate a particular grievance. The College prohibits retaliation against individuals who utilize this policy, who participate in the investigative process, or who oppose a discriminatory practice or policy.

      Scope

      This policy applies to all student disability related concerns covered by this policy.

      Policy

      If a student believes he or she was wrongfully denied accommodation(s), believes the final accommodation(s) provided are not reasonable, believes that the approved reasonable accommodation(s) was not provided, or if the student believes for any other reason that unlawful discrimination, harassment or a violation of rights with respect to the granting or implementation of accommodation(s) under the ADA/Section 504, has occurred, should follow the process set forth below. Other individuals may also submit a concern to the College on behalf of a student pursuant to this policy; however, because of privacy considerations the College may not be able to divulge all information regarding the concern, investigation or outcome to these individuals. During the grievance process set forth below, any accommodations or services that have already been implemented will continue uninterrupted.

      The College will endeavor to complete the investigative process as expeditiously as possible and typically in no longer than thirty (30) days; however, the individual circumstances of each situation will dictate the timing of the entire process. The College will update the student regarding the status of the process. Students seeking an accommodation for this policy and process should contact the College’s Disability Services Office as soon as possible.

      Step 1

      A student with a concern covered by this policy (described above) may first attempt to resolve it at the informal level. This is accomplished by the student discussing the concern with the individual with whom the concern arose or with the supervisor of the individual with whom the concern arose, in the event the student is not comfortable discussing it directly with the individual. The student should also simultaneously inform the College’s Disability Services Office of the concern. Many concerns can arise from misunderstandings and can be amicably resolved at this informal level. Students are not required to engage in this informal resolution and may proceed directly to Step 2 below at any time.

      Step 2

      A student with a concern covered by this policy (described above), who does not wish the attempt to resolve the concern at the informal level, or who has attempted unsuccessfully to informally resolve a concern, should contact the College’s Disability Services Office by phone at 573-875-7626 or via email at disabilityservices@ccis.edu to schedule a meeting to discuss the student’s concern as soon as possible after the concern arises. This is an opportunity for the student to provide all information to the College’s Disability Services Office that he or she would like considered related to his or her concern. The student shall provide this information in written form and include his or her desired resolution and outcome.

      The College’s Disability Services Office, or designee, will then undertake an investigation into the student’s concern. During the investigation, all parties will have the opportunity to identify witnesses and provide evidence, documents, and information for consideration and review. Investigations will be handled discreetly, with information shared only with those individuals who need to know the information in order for there to be a full and fair investigation.

      At the conclusion of the investigation, the College’s Disability Services Office will communicate the determination of the investigation via written notification to the student and the other party (if applicable). The written notice will include a summary of allegations, findings of fact, and a determination as to whether or not the alleged wrongdoing occurred.

      Step 3

      If a student is dissatisfied with the determination of the College’s Disability Services Office, the student may appeal this determination to the Dean for Student Affairs. Appeals may only be basedon the following:

      • There is a substantial likelihood that newly discovered information, not available at the time information was provided during the investigation, would result in a different decision;
      • There was a procedural error significant enough to call the outcome into question;
      • There was a clear error in factual findings; or
      • Improper bias or prejudice influenced the outcome of the investigation.

      Appeals must be received in writing by the Dean of Student Affairs within ten (10) business days of the date the Disability Services Office issues its determination. Appeals may be submitted via email to DeanforStudentAffairs@ccis.edu and additional information about this policy and process can be obtained any time by calling the Student Affairs Office at 573-875-7400. Appeals must contain, at a minimum, an explanation of why the determination is improper and a detailed statement of the basis for the appeal, including the specific facts, circumstances, and arguments in support of the appeal.

      The Dean of Student Affairs will review the

      • Information provided by the student for the appeal;
      • Investigation and determination of the College’s Disability Services Office; and
      • Any other additional information that may be relevant to evaluating the matter and reaching a decision.

      The Dean for Student Affairs will resolve the appeal and reach a decision within ten (10) business days of receiving the appeal and may take any actions determined to be in the interest of a fair and just decision. The decision of the Dean for Student Affairs is final and not appealable. The Dean for Student Affairs shall issue a written notice of the resolution of the appeal to the student and the other party (if applicable), including changes, if any, made to the investigation determination.

      Grievance Form for Disability Services

      Form can be accessed at the following link:

      Grievance Policy Flow Chart

      Step 1

      Informal Grievance (Verbal)
      Complainant discusses concern with appropriate professional within 30 days of the alleged occurrence. If not resolved, move to step 2

      Step 2

      Formal Grievance (Written)
      Complainant files a written grievance of the alleged occurrence with the Director of Disability Services within 30 days using the "Grievance Form" for Disability Services.
      The complainant and/or other parties involved will be interviewed. If written reports are requested through the interview process these reports must be submitted within 48 hours.
      The complainant and/or other parties will be notified of the resolution within 10 days.
      If the complainant is not satisfied with the resolution, move to step 3

      Step III

      Appeal of Formal Grievance
      Complainant should notify the Dean for Student Affairs of their intent to file a grievance.
      The notification to file a grievance should be submitted using the "Grievance Form" for Disability Services. This must be completed within 5 days of the director's response (completion of Step II).
      The Dean for Student Affairs will have 10 days to review the appeal and issue a written determination of the appeal indicating resolution.
      The complainant can appeal the decision of the Dean for Student Affairs within 5 days of the resolution, moving to:

      Step 4

      Hearing
      The hearing board must hear the grievance within 10 days of the referral from the Dean for Student Affairs.
      The complainant will be notified 5 days prior to the hearing date.
      The hearing board has 15 days to investigate issues brought up in the hearing.
      The hearing board will render its decision in writing within 15 days.
      If the complainant wishes to appeal the decision of the board, move to step 5

      Step V

      Formal Complaint of Discrimination
      If complainant is not satisfied with the decision of the hearing board the complainant may choose to file a complaint with the federal Office of Civil Rights.

      Procedures

      Procedure for Students with Disabilities to Self-disclose:

      • Students who have a disability must contact the Disability Services Office to self-disclose their disability.
      • Columbia College has designated the Director of Disability Services as the person students with disabilities should contact to self-disclose their disability.
      • The student with a disability can contact the Director through a personal appointment, phone call, or email.
      • The Disability Services Office is located in AHSC, Room 215.  The phone number is (573) 875-7626.  Email address is disabilityservices@ccis.edu.
      • All documentation of the disability should be directed to the Disability Services Office.
      • Students should self-disclose as soon as possible.  Students should be aware it takes time to make arrangements for the accommodations you need.  If you do not provide adequate time for those arrangements to be made, Disability Services cannot assure the accommodations will be in place when you need them.

      Procedure for Requesting/Receiving Accommodations:

      To initiate recognition and consideration as a student with a disability, students must:

      • Self-disclose their disability to Disability Services in person, by phone or by email.
      • Participate in an intake interview to begin the registration process.
      • Provide external documentation to the coordinator of Disability Services.
      • Complete all paperwork to finalize registration.
        • Request for Service Form
        • Confidentiality Form
        • Accommodation Agreement Form
      • Follow Columbia College procedures and policies as set forth in the Disability Services Handbook.

      Guidelines

      Accommodation guidelines:

      What are accommodations?

      Accommodations are academic adjustments designed to provide equal access to a documented student with a disability. A "reasonable and appropriate accommodation" is a modification, adjustment and/or auxiliary aid that minimizes or eliminates the impact of a disability. A "reasonable and appropriate accommodation" is one that does not:

      • require a substantial change or alteration in the curriculum to an essential element of a course or program fundamentally alter the nature of the service provided.
      • pose an undue financial hardship or administrative burden.
      • pose a direct threat to the health and safety of others.

      There are no set accommodations for specific disabilities. All accommodations are granted based upon verifying documentation and the intake interview between the coordinator and the student. Documentation can suggest many different accommodations; however, it is at the discretion of Disability Services what is considered a "reasonable" accommodation. As a result, not all accommodations suggested by the student will necessarily be granted.  

      In college, a student is responsible for his/her success. Colleges must provide access to educational programs and services, and they must respond to appropriately made requests for eligible accommodations. Once accommodations have been provided, however, it is up to the student to manage his/her success. Each student maintains his/her individual rights to succeed or to fail in the academic setting.  

      Why are accommodations given?

      Accommodations are given when it can be demonstrated that the student would not have an equal chance to demonstrate knowledge/mastery of what the course covers because of the disability. You must remember students with disabilities are not like everyone else in class. They have disabilities. If you look up the word "fair" and the word "just" in the dictionary, in this context you will find that "fair" is defined as meaning "the same (treatment) to everyone" while "just" is defined as "each according to his/her need." The Americans with Disabilities Act is about "each according to his/her need." If we as an institution are concerned about equal opportunity to students, then it is imperative that accommodations be provided to documented students with disabilities. To do anything less would deny these students of an equal chance to show what they can do.

      Disability Statement for course syllabus guidelines:

      All course syllabuses must have a statement providing contact information for Disability Services. A statement might read as follows: 

       "Students with documented disabilities who may need academic services for this course are required to register with the coordinator for Disability Services at (573) 875-7626 or disabilityservices@ccis.edu. Until the student has been cleared through the disability services office, accommodations are not to be granted. If you are a student who has a documented disability, it is important for you to read the entire syllabus before you enroll in this course. The structure or the content of the course may make accommodation not feasible."

      Documentation guidelines:

      The policy for documentation is divided into three tiers. 

      • The student’s self-report to the Director during the student Intake Interview.
      • Information shared from professors, counselors, parents, and others may be taken into account as well as the observations of the Director.
      • External documentation from the professional diagnosing the disability.

      This documentation ideally should:

      • Identify the condition causing disability or disabilities.
      • Describe the functional limitations it causes.
      • Include any relevant history of the student’s experiences with the disability, including treatment.
      • Provide relevant test data—and names of instruments, if applicable.

      A list of specific accommodations requested (which should include a rationale connecting them to the disability) is welcome but not required.

      Through a deliberative and collaborative process along with professional judgment by the Director, effective accommodations will be granted providing the student equal access based on their disability and will be determined on an individual case by case basis.

      Emergency Plan Guidelines

      Columbia College’s Critical Incident Response Guidelines for Faculty and Staff should be used for all emergency situations. There are additional considerations when responding to an emergency regarding a student with a disability.

      Develop a plan of action for students with mobility, visual, or hearing limitations.  Ultimately, the person with the disability is responsible for his/her own safety, but it is important that the instructor play a role in a student evacuation.

      For a student with mobility limitations, direct him or her to an area of safety.  This could be a stairway, a classroom adjacent to a stairway or an internal room away from windows (in case of tornados).  Note the location of the stairway or room and make sure the student is not blocking the exits which could cause harm to other students.  Once the student is relocated, the instructor should alert emergency personnel of the location and need for evacuation.  If you have a cell phone and the student does not, leave the cell phone with the student.  In most situations, do not attempt to carry a person in a wheelchair as it could result in injuries.

      Students who are blind or have low vision should already be familiar with their surroundings after mobility and orientation training.  However, they may not be aware of emergency exits.  In case of an emergency, alert the student to the nature of the situation.  Use the sighted guide technique (offer the person an elbow and proceed ahead) to direct the student to the nearest emergency exit or to another location that is considered safe in the building.  Alert the student to any obstacles, debris, doorways, or narrow passages.  Once you are to safety, orient the student to his or her surroundings and seek additional assistance if needed.

      Students who are deaf or hard of hearing may not hear alarms or other audible warnings.  The instructor should inform the student of the emergency.  This can be done in three ways:

      1. Write a note for the student alerting him or her to the emergency and instruct him or her where to go;
      2. Turn the light switch off and on to gain attention; or
      3. Tap his or her shoulder.  In most situations, an interpreter will be in the classroom to explain the emergency to the student.  Provide any assistance that the student might need.

      Students who have a seizure disorder are usually able to control their seizures through medication.  It should be noted though, that medical management of a seizure is not always effective.  Seizures may occur in the classroom.  Students with active seizure disorders should inform you of their condition and instruct you on how to handle the seizure if one should occur.  Below are guidelines for handing a seizure situation:

      • Keep calm.
      • Once a seizure begins, it cannot be stopped.
      • Do not try to restrain the individual.
      • Lower the individual to the ground or floor if possible and clear the area of furniture to avoid injury.
      • Try not to interfere with movements in any way.
      • Cushion the head with a sweater, coat, etc.
      • Do not force anything between the teeth.
      • Do not try to revive the person.  Let the seizure run its course.

      After the movement has stopped, the person should be placed in a SIDE LYING POSITION IF POSSIBLE, until consciousness is regained. All of this may take 10 minutes or less, but the person should be observed until all evidence of confusion has passed.  After the seizure activity stops, it is common for the person to note a headache, sore muscles, or drowsiness. This may mean an hour or so may pass before the person can go home or return to class.  The person should never drive after a seizure.  The person can be moved as soon as he/she has regained consciousness, preferable by wheelchair, to the Health Services Clinic, a lounge, or some other less public place. Please call Campus Safety for immediate assistance. 

      Call 911, especially if the person does not have a seizure history and it is imperative the student be evaluated in an emergency room ASAP.

      If the person has a history of seizures, contact the Nurse Practitioner of the event, so the person can be further accessed.  If there is uncertainty about whether the patient is breathing, not having a pulse, color looking bluish, or seizure lasting more than 5 minutes, call 911 immediately.

      Elevator breakdowns and repairs-If you realize an elevator is not working, contact the proper personnel to immediately request repair.  Students who use wheelchairs should be directed to another accessible way to get to where they are going.  If the elevator is out of commission for several days, the classroom may need to be moved in order to accommodate the student.

      Flexibility with Deadlines guidelines:

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations which meets a student’s documented disability-related academic needs.  Neither the college nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability.  Recognizing that Online instructors are required to report attendance based on the students participation in the course each week, regardless of the disability, students qualifying for the “flexibility of deadlines” accommodation can be granted extensions for deadlines when the disability has prevented the student from being able to work on the assignment due to the flare-up.  Students with disabilities who do not participate in the course during the week will be given an unexcused absence.  

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:

      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for the “flexibility with deadlines” accommodation.
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the Director once the student registers for the new semester/session.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when in a flare-up condition.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation from a medical professional verifying the student is in a flare-up state.
      • The student should understand the “flexibility of deadlines” accommodation provides relief from missed deadlines. However it is at the discretion of the instructor if they want to extend the deadline or not.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed for the entire courses.
      • If the student asks for extensions for every assignment after the first two to three weeks of class the student might want to consider withdrawing from the course.  A student can get too far behind to be able to complete the course work on time.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class the College’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.
      • It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class follows the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.

      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:

      • Once the instructor is notified of the “flexibility with deadlines” accommodation the instructor should have a private conversation or email exchange with the student outlining the instructor’s expectation from the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the instructor’s discretion to ask for medical documentation.  It should be noted for certain disabilities the students might simply need bed rest and not need to see a doctor.
      • The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on work missed.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s request for extensions on deadlines threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of the learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and the Director to review possible options.
      • If the student asks for extensions for every assignment after the first two weeks of the class the student might want to consider withdrawing from the course as they will get too far behind to be able to complete the course work on time.

      Example of how to address the “flexibility with deadlines” accommodation:

      The example below is taken primarily from one instructor.  I received permission to share it with another instructor and have added the additional piece from that instructor for a combined example.

      Hello [student];

      I wanted to touch base with you regarding the ADA accommodation for “flexibility with deadlines.”  I understand that your accommodation is to be allowed flexibility in submitting assignments when you are having a flare up. My understanding from the Director for Disability Services, is that it is up to me to decide how to implement this accommodation. The following guidelines have been approved by the Director of Disability Services, and find a "best practice" balance between course/grade integrity and the requested ADA accommodation.

      For all assignments, I would need notification before the deadline that you need an extension.

      For example, the Primary Post (see syllabus for definition) is due by Wednesday at midnight each week. I would need to be informed no later than Wednesday that you need an extension. If you are unable to notify me prior to the deadline that you need an extension, then you will need to provide a medical excuse for an extension after-the-fact. For your Primary Posts, I would allow an extension of two days maximum.

      Secondary Comments (see syllabus for definition) to classmates' posts must be submitted on time -- no later than the Saturday deadline. The reason for this is the dynamic nature of the online course environment.

      The Drop box assignment will receive the same extension consideration as the Primary Post.  I would need to be notified in advance that you need an extension. I will allow no more than two days for an extension. If it is not possible to notify me in advance, then you'll need to provide a medical excuse for an extension.

      • The weekly Quizzes are available for students to take for the entire week they are due. Additionally, I have added 1.5 or double time to your quiz times (depends on what the LOA states). An extension would be allowed only if a medical excuse is provided that covers the entire period the exam or quiz was available.
      • Please keep in mind that course attendance is based on participation during the course week. Participation means that the student has submitted discussion posts or other assignments during a given course week. If a student doesn't participate in the course for a given week regardless of the reason, the student must be counted absent.
      • In closing, I look forward to your successful completion of the course material. The best way to ensure that success is to work ahead. It is important for students to stay as up to date as possible on assignments so they don't fall behind. Juggling late work and current assignments can become difficult. Following are some things to consider regarding working ahead.
      • * Primary posts: Using the course material in the syllabus, you already know all the assignments and all the Primary Post topics for the entire course. Those can all be completed immediately, and then copied to the actual course website at the proper time.
      • * Secondary Comments: These are due by Saturday at midnight, but can be done at any time during the week.
      • * Weekly Quizzes: The quizzes for each week opens at 1:00 a.m. Monday morning, and the student has until the following Sunday at midnight to complete the quiz. This is a full seven days to take each quiz.
      • * Drop box - the term paper: I always encourage students to start their papers at the beginning of class. The term paper is not due until the end of the sixth week, but the student can write the paper in the first day if they want to. The syllabus provides all the information needed to write the paper, along with a grading rubric at the end of the syllabus. I have also posted several helpful videos.

      Leniency of Attendance Accommodation guidelines: (In-seat classes only)

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations which meets a student’s documented disability-related academic needs.  Neither the College nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability.  Each department identifies and defines the essential or fundamental academic requirements for its courses.  Recognizing that faculty may have established strict, enforced policies regarding the number of absences that will be allowed before a student faces sanctions, and that some students with disabilities have medically-related conditions of an episodic nature or other established reasons that their disability may make it difficult for them to fulfill the typical attendance requirements, the Disability Services Office has established the following guidelines for considering/granting requests for leniency in classroom attendance policies.

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations which meets a student’s documented disability-related academic needs.  Neither the College nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability.  Each department identifies and defines the essential or fundamental academic requirements for its courses.  Recognizing that faculty may have established strict, enforced policies regarding the number of absences that will be allowed before a student faces sanctions, and that some students with disabilities have medically-related conditions of an episodic nature or other established reasons that their disability may make it difficult for them to fulfill the typical attendance requirements, the Disability Services Office has established the following guidelines to assist the instructor/student in working through this accommodation:

      • This accommodation does not give the student the right to miss classes.
      • Instructors will work with students who may have to miss class because of a disability-related reason. This accommodation is more readily accepted when the student’s attitude is one of being a hard worker and consistently completes all work prior to a flare-up occurring.
      • The student must request consideration of this policy at the beginning of each new semester/session from the Director of Disability Services.
      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for disability-related absences to the Director.
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the student or Director of Disability Services at the start of each new semester/session.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when a disability-related absence will occur/has occurred and when necessary inform the instructor when he/she will return to class.
      •  If the student cannot reach the instructor then the student should contact the Director.  The Director will relay to the instructor information pertaining to the student.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation verifying the disability-related absence.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s absences from class threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and Director of Disability Services to review available options.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class the College’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.  It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class will follow the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.
      • The student should understand the “Leniency of Attendance” accommodation provides relief from requirements for physical/virtual attendance in classes.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed during disability-related absences.
      • The instructor is not responsible for keeping the student current on worked missed.
      • Extension of deadlines for assignments due, or arrangements for making up tests and exams missed, during disability-related absences must be negotiated individually with the instructor as the need arises.

      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:

      • Once the instructor is notified of the “leniency of attendance” accommodation the instructor should have a private conversation/or email with the student outlining the instructor’s expectation from the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor to ask for medical documentation when a student is absent due to their disability.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s absences from class threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and Director of Disability Services to review available options.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student might not need to see a doctor but can still be prevented from being/participating in class because of the disability.
      • The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on worked missed.
      • Extension of deadlines for assignments due or arrangements for making up tests and exams missed during disability-related absences are NOT included in this assigned accommodation.  This must be negotiated individually with the student as the need arises.
      • A suggested guideline when SWD receive Leniency of Attendance (as described above), is to allow a 24 hour period to turn in any homework assignment that was due on the day of the absence.  If an exam is missed a general guideline would be to give the student a 24-48 hour window to make up the exam.  It is recommended to work this out before hand with the student so they understand the expectation of the instructor if such a flare-up or hospitalization should occur.  The instructor should inform the student if they want documentation to verify the absence. 
      • If a student misses more than two weeks of class because of the disability it is reasonable to suggest to the student the option of withdrawing.
      • If the attendance becomes an issue closer to the end of class an Incomplete would be an option for the student also.

      Temporary Impairment guidelines

      Temporary impairments such as broken bones, short-term illnesses and recovery from surgery or medical conditions are generally not regarded as disabilities. The degree of functional limitation and/or the short duration of the impairment might not qualify the condition as a disability; however, Columbia College recognizes that temporary impairment may cause difficulties related to a student’s academic progress and success in the on-campus community in a given semester. Students who have a temporary impairment should contact Disability Services for assistance. There might be a circumstance when a student will opt not to use an accommodation. If you would like to document this and keep it for your records, please use the Accommodation Waiver Form located here: Accommodation Waiver Form.

      Form

      The Accomodation Waiver Form can be found online at the following link: Accommodation Waiver Form

      Faculty Training guides

      Training guide on implementing accommodations for Day Campus faculty

      Pursuant to federal laws and regulations postsecondary institutions must ensure that their policies or practices do not have the effect of discriminating against students with disabilities.

      The purpose of this Training Guide is to provide direction to instructor for implementing accommodations assigned to students in their courses.  All students with disabilities participate in an extensive Intake Interview with the Director to determine “reasonable” accommodations based upon the functional limitations of their disability.  Accommodations are arrived at on a case-by-case basis.  In other words one size does not fit all.  Accommodations go into effect once the instructor receives the Letter of Accommodation (LOA) from Disability Services.  Accommodations are not retroactive.  If an instructor does not receive a LOA for a student the accommodations are not to be given. 

      Disability Services encourages self-advocacy by students with disabilities (SWD) to communicate with the instructor about accommodations.  The student will provide the LOA to the instructor and best practice if for the student/instructor to discuss the accommodations and the logistics of implementing them.  Disability Services will provide a copy of the LOA to the instructor but the accommodations are not to be provided until the student provides the original copy to the instructor.

      If you are in disagreement with the accommodation this should be addressed with Disability Services not the student.  It can be construed as discriminatory if the instructor questions the accommodation the student is receiving and/or implies the need for the accommodation is not there.  You must provide the accommodation until a resolution is reached. This places the college at risk for a grievance being filed.

      The potential accommodations below are by no means a comprehensive list of accommodations available through Disability Services.  However, these accommodations tend to appear most frequently on LOAs issued and seem to elicit the most questions by faculty administrating them to our students.

      Classroom accommodations

      Note-taking accommodation:

      Instructor responsibilities include:

      • On the first day of class, the instructor should ask for a student volunteer to take notes. The name of the student they are requesting a note-taker for should not be revealed to the class.
      • The instructor and the note-taker should make arrangements on the copying and exchanging of notes.
      • The instructor is to arrange with the student a time and place to pick up the notes.
      • If a note-taker cannot be found, the instructor can fulfill this accommodation by providing their own notes to the student.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to ask the student if it is OK to reveal their identity to the note-taker and then have the student and note-taker work out the exchanging of the notes.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to provide PowerPoint slides to the student, but hte best practice would be to visit with the student to make sure this is sufficient for the notes. If so, a note-taker will not be needed as the slides would serve as the notes.  
      Note-takers responsibilities:
      • Writing legibly, using paper and pen that reproduces well on a standard copier.
      • Label each days notes with title and section of the class, date and page number.
      • Deliver the notes to the instructor at the end of each class session.
      • The student should contact the instructor if they are going to be absent from class.
      Student responsibilities:
      • Inform the instructor of the need for a note-taker as indicated in the LOA from Disability Services.
      • Work out a system with the instructor for picking up notes.
      • Be aware that if you are not in class you are not eligible for the notes that day.
      Other option for note-taking:
      • Have the note-taker use a laptop to take notes for the notes to be shared electronically with the instructor who will then give the notes to the student.  
      Tape recording accommodation:

      An instructor may not forbid a student’s use of an aid if that prohibition limits the student’s participation in the school program. In accordance with subpart E of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 "a recipient may not impose upon handicapped students other rules, such as prohibition of tape recorders in classroom or of guide dogs in campus buildings that have the effect of limiting the participation of handicapped students in the recipient’s education program or activity."

      In order to allow a student the use of an effective aid and, at the same time, protect the instructor, the institution requires the student to sign an agreement so as not to infringe on a potential copyright or to limit freedom of speech.  

      From the Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

      Instructor responsibility with tape recording:
      • The instructor has the right to ask the student not to record if the class discussion is of a personal nature. 
      Student responsibilities with tape recording:
      • Recording of the class lectures are only for the student’s personal use in study and preparation related to the course.
      • The student may not share their recordings with any other person, whether or not that person is in his/her class.
      • The student acknowledges the recordings are sources, the use of which in any academic works is governed by rules of academic conduct for the college.
      • The student will destroy any recordings that were made when they are no longer needed for his/her academic work.
      • Failure on the student’s part to abide by these provisions might result in loss of permission to audio record class lectures.  
      Use of computer for in-class assignments:

      Students who have LOAs with the accommodation of using a word processor for in-class assignments should be permitted to use a laptop to type a writing assignment done in class.  Because these students might not have direct access to an in-room printer, they should be permitted to email the instructor the file at the end of the class, or print it and hand it in at a later time. Note: If any assignments or homework are timed and the student has the accommodation of extended time then the student must be given the time allocated for tests/quizzes to complete their assignments and homework.  

      Access to PowerPoint slides and overheads before class begins:

      These students should be given print-out copies of the day’s PowerPoint slides before class begins. The slides can be sent via email in advance of class.  

      Pre-arranged breaks accommodation:

      Students might have the accommodation of pre-arranged breaks.  The student is responsible for any work that is missed while on break.

      Stand and sit at will accommodation:

      A student might need to stand for a few minutes at certain points throughout the class. The instructor and the student should discuss the logistics of this accommodation prior to the course starting. The action by the student should cause as little interruption as possible. Having the student sit at the back of the room would cause the least disturbance.  

      Preferential seating accommodation:

      The student has permission to sit at a designated place in the classroom (front, back, against the wall, visibility of the door etc.) The instructor should guarantee the designated seating for the student.

      Enlargement of handouts/tests/quizzes:

      When the accommodation states the students handouts/tests/quizzes should be enlarged to a certain font size, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make sure this is done. This can be done via the computer in most cases if the handouts are Word documents or PDFs.  

      Use of a four-function calculator in class and on exams and quizzes:

      Student with this accommodation are permitted to use a four-function (add, subtract, multiply, divide) calculator on any in-class work or exam that requires mathematical computation provided the exams or assignments are not designed to test the student’s ability to perform functions that the calculator performs.

      Visual media:

      All visual media shown in class or through the Internet should be captioned.

      Exam accommodations

      Use of the Testing Center/Disability Services for testing:

      • The student will bring the instructor a Test Accommodation Form (TAF) to complete.
      • The student will take the TAF to the Testing Center to schedule their test or to Disability Services.
      • Disability Services tests students who need a reader, scribe or have mobility issues. All other students will test at the Testing Center.
      • Both the Testing Center and Disability Services will request the test from the instructor a week prior to the date scheduled for the exam by sending you a Test Request Form. You must include the Test Request Form with the test when you send it to the proper testing site. The completed test will be returned to you by the method you checked on the Test Request Form.  

      Additional comments for testing students with disabilities:

      1. Students with disabilities should be afforded the same respect and courtesy as all students and receive their tests back within the same time frame as all students. For example, if students in the classroom take a test on Wednesday and get the test back on Monday, the student with a disability should get the test back at the same time or at the next class period. The student with a disability will probably test on Tuesday or Thursday, so the test should be picked up from Academic Affairs as soon as possible, graded and handed back to the student. A solution to the logistics of picking up the test in a timely manner would be to have the Testing Center or Disability Services simply scan the test back to the instructor so the test can be graded immediately and returned back to the student when the class meets again. 
      2. The student with a disability and the instructor are to fill out the Test Accommodation Form together. The instructor should note the date and time the student has signed up to test and make sure the test is delivered to the Testing Center or Disability Services before the time the student is scheduled to test. The Testing Center/Disability Services should send the instructor a Test Request Form letting the instructor know the date/time of the test so there should be no reason why the test is not provided well ahead of when the student is scheduled to test.
      3. If the instructor prefers to test their own students and not use the Testing Center/Disability Services, then you must make sure you are following the accommodations.  An example would be not to place a student in the hallway to test if they have minimal distraction as an accommodation. If the student is to get two hours the instructor cannot tell the student to come at 4 p.m. to start the test and then join class lecture when they are done testing, causing them to miss out on the lecture given to the class. If the instructor is reviewing for a test the instructor cannot ask the student with a disability to test while holding the class review because the instructor would rather the student test the same as other students are taking the test instead of testing with Testing Services/Disability Services.
      4. The student cannot be forced to test when the class tests if this interferes with the student getting the accommodation of extended time. Students' schedules will not always allow a student to test at the time the class is testing. If a student has a class before and after, they will not get their extended time so they must be allowed to test at a different time.  

      Extended time on tests/quizzes accommodation:

      Students are normally granted either x1.5 or x2 (double time). A student with x1.5 is given half of that time added on to the 50 minutes.  In this example the student would get a total of 75 minutes for the test.

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must discuss with the student how/where/when the test will be taken in order for the student to receive the extended time.
      • The instructor must complete the TAF and return it back with the test to the correct testing site.
      • The student cannot be expected to miss class lectures or reviews to take a test.
      • If a student misses a test, the instructor must let the proctor site know it is OK for the student to reschedule the test.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student should arrange with the testing site the time they need to test for their proctored test.
      • The student must be cognizant of the times the testing site is open and make sure they have adequate time to complete the test within the operating hours.
      • The student must be on time for the test. If the student is late, the amount of time they are late should be subtracted from the start time.
      • If the student cannot take the test, they should contact the testing site to let them know as well as the instructor and get permission from the instructor to retake the test.

      Note: If the instructor increases the standard administration time for the entire class, this must be taken into account before calculating the extended time for the student with a disability.    

      Testing in a minimal distraction environment:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must let the proctoring site know the student is to test with no more than three or four people in the room.
      • The arranged location must be free from distractions as much as possible.
      • The location should be in a room, not a hallway outside the classroom.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student must be on time and if the student is not, the time he or she is late will be subtracted from the time designated for the test.

      Sitting students in the back of a crowded classroom or asking the class to remain silent does not constitute a reduced distraction environment. 

      Note: The Testing Policy for students with disabilities can be found on the Disability Services website or at the following link: Disability Services Handbook 2012-2013 pg. 8-10  

      Other potential accommodations

      Alternative textbooks (CDs; PDFs) in accessible formats:

      • This accommodation is handled through Disability Services.
      • Students will use a screen reader to read the text to them.
      • There is a process the student must follow to receive the textbook in an alternate format.  

      Leniency of attendance:

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations that meet a student’s documented disability-related academic needs. Neither the College nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability. Each department identifies and defines the essential or fundamental academic requirements for its courses. Recognizing that faculty may have established strict, enforced policies regarding the number of absences that will be allowed before a student faces sanctions and that some students with disabilities have medically-related conditions of an episodic nature or other established reasons that their disability may make it difficult for them to fulfill the typical attendance requirements, Disability Services has established the following guidelines for considering/granting requests for leniency in classroom attendance policies.

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:
      • The student must request consideration of this policy at the beginning of each new semester/session from the coordinator of Disability Services.
      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for disability-related absences to the coordinator.
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the student (Day Campus and Evening Campus) or by the coordinator of Disability Services (Online Campus and Nationwide Campuses) at the start of each new semester/session. It is at this point the accommodation becomes effective.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when a disability-related absence will occur/has occurred and, when necessary, inform the instructor when he/she will return to class. If the student cannot reach the instructor then the student should contact the coordinator. The coordinator will relay to the instructor information pertaining to the student.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation verifying the disability-related absence.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student would not need to see a doctor but could still be prevented from being/participating in class.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class, the college’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.
      • It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class will follow the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.
      • Both the instructor and student should understand the "leniency of attendance" accommodation provides relief from requirements for physical/virtual attendance in classes.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed during disability-necessitated absence.
      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:
      • Once the instructor is notified of the "leniency of attendance" accommodation, the instructor should have a private conversation or email with the student outlining the instructor’s expectation from the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor to ask for medical documentation when a student is absent due to their disability.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s absences from class threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and coordinator of Disability Services to review available options.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student might not need to see a doctor but can still be prevented from being/participating in class because of the disability.
      • The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on worked missed.
      • Extension of deadlines for assignments due or arrangements for making up tests and exams missed during disability-related absences are NOT included in this assigned accommodation. This must be negotiated individually with the student as the need arises.
      • A suggested guideline when a student receives the "leniency of attendance" accommodation is to allow a 24-hour period to turn in any homework assignment that was due on the day of the absence. If an exam is missed, a general guideline would be to give the student a 24- to 48-hour window to make up the exam. It is recommended to work this out beforehand with the student so they understand the expectation of the instructor if such a flare-up or hospitalization should occur. The instructor should inform the student if they want documentation to verify the absence.
      • If a student misses more than two weeks of class because of the disability, it is reasonable to suggest the option of withdrawing to the student.
      •  If the attendance becomes an issue closer to the end of class, an "Incomplete" would also be an option for the student.  

      Use of adaptive technology:

      Students who qualify for the use of adaptive technology such as portable CCTVs, screen readers, word processors, voice to text software, braille keypads, FM systems, etc., should be permitted to use this technology in the classroom and during exams unless otherwise noted on the LOA or unless it presents a health risk to the student or others. If an instructor is concerned about the use of adaptive technology in the classroom, they should contact Disability Services at (573) 875-7626.

      Spelling and grammar errors:

      Student with this accommodation should be given leniency for spelling and/or grammar errors on in-class assignments and exams provided the assignments and tests have not been designed to measure these skills.

      Use of interpreters:

      Students who are hearing impaired can use interpreters in the classroom. The responsibility of obtaining the interpreters lies with Disability Services. As soon as Disability Services knows there will be a hearing-impaired student in the classroom, the instructor will be notified.  

      A video on how to work with an interpreter in the classroom will be provided to the instructor.

      Temporary adjustments needed:

      Students will often get in accidents and need temporary assistance. This student is not a student with a disability, so the instructor can provide whatever adjustments are needed for the time frame the student needs assistance. This does not have to be cleared through Disability Services.   

      Oral testing: 

      Students who qualify to be given their exams orally should be allowed to audibly say their answers to the instructor without writing or typing them. Given the one-on-one nature of this accommodation, a separate time and place should be established where the instructor can meet with the student and proctor the exam.

      Training guide on implementing accommodations for Evening Campus instructors

      Pursuant to federal laws and regulations, postsecondary institutions must ensure that their policies or practices do not have the effect of discriminating against students with disabilities.  

      The purpose of this training guide is to provide direction to an instructor on implementing accommodations assigned to students in their courses. All students with disabilities participate in an extensive intake interview with the coordinator to determine "reasonable" accommodations based upon the functional limitations of their disability. Accommodations are arrived at on a case-by-case basis. In other words, one size does not fit all.  Accommodations go into effect once the instructor receives the Letter of Accommodation (LOA) from Disability Services. Accommodations are not retroactive. If an instructor does not receive a LOA for a student, the accommodations are not to be given.   

      Disability Services encourages self-advocacy by students with disabilities to communicate with the instructor about accommodations. The student will provide the LOA to the instructor, and the best practice is for the student and instructor to discuss the accommodations and the logistics of implementing them. Disability Services will provide a copy of the LOA to the instructor, but the accommodations are not to be provided until the student provides the original copy to the instructor.

      If you are in disagreement with the accommodation, this should be addressed with Disability Services, not the student. It can be construed as discriminatory if the instructor questions the accommodation the student is receiving and/or implies the need for the accommodation is not there. You must provide the accommodation until a resolution is reached, or the college is placed at risk for a grievance being filed.  

      The potential accommodations below are by no means a comprehensive list of accommodations available through Disability Services. However, these accommodations tend to appear most frequently on LOAs issued and seem to elicit the most questions by faculty administrating them to our students.

      Classroom accommodations

      Note-taking accommodation:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • On the first day of class the instructor should ask for a student volunteer to take notes. The name of the student they are requesting a note-taker for should not be revealed to the class.
      • The instructor and the note-taker should make arrangements on the copying and exchanging of notes.
      • The instructor is to arrange with the student a time and place to pick up the notes.
      • If a note-taker cannot be found, the instructor can fulfill this accommodation by providing their own notes to the student.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to ask the student if it is OK to reveal their identity to the note-taker and then have the student and note-taker work out the exchanging of the notes.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to provide PowerPoint slides to the student, but the best practice would be to visit with the student to make sure this is sufficient for notes. If so, a note-taker will not be needed as the slides would serve as the notes.  
      Note-takers responsibilities:
      • Writing legibly, using paper and pen that reproduces well on a standard copier.
      • Label each days notes with title and section of the class, date and page number.
      • Deliver the notes to the instructor at the end of each class session.
      • The student should contact the instructor if they are going to be absent from class.
      Student responsibilities:
      • Inform the instructor of the need for a note-taker as indicated in the LOA from Disability Services.
      • Work out a system with the instructor for picking up notes.
      • Be aware that if you are not in class you are not eligible for the notes that day.  
      Other option for note-taking:
      • Have the note-taker use a laptop to take notes and share them electronically with the instructor, who will then give the notes to the student.  

      Tape recording accommodation:

      An instructor may not forbid a student’s use of an aid if that prohibition limits the student’s participation in the school program. In accordance with subpart E of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 "a recipient may not impose upon handicapped students other rules, such as prohibition of tape recorders in classroom or of guide dogs in campus buildings that have the effect of limiting the participation of handicapped students in the recipient’s education program or activity."

      In order to allow a student the use of an effective aid and, at the same time, protect the instructor, the institution requires the student to sign an agreement so as not to infringe on a potential copyright or to limit freedom of speech.  

      From the Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. http://www.2/ed/gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html       

      Instructor responsibility with tape recording:
      • The instructor has the right to ask the student not to record if the class discussion is of a personal nature.
      Student responsibilities with tape recording:
      • Recording of the class lectures are only for the student’s personal use in study and preparation related to the course.
      • The student may not share their recordings with any other person, whether or not that person is in his/her class.
      • The student acknowledges the recordings are sources, the use of which in any academic works is governed by rules of academic conduct for the college.
      • The student will destroy any recordings that were made when they are no longer needed for his/her academic work.
      • Failure on the student’s part to abide by these provisions might result in loss of permission of audio tape/audio record class lectures.  

      Use of computer for in-class assignments:

      Students who have LOAs with the accommodation of using a word processor for in-class assignments should be permitted to use a laptop to type a writing assignment done in class.  Because these students might not have direct access to an in-room printer they should be permitted to email the instructor the file at the end of the class or print it and hand it in at a later time.

      Note: If any assignments or homework are timed and the student has the accommodation of extended time, then the student must be given the time allocated for tests/quizzes to complete their assignments and homework.  

      Access to PowerPoint and overheads before class begins:

      These students should be given print-out copies of the day’s PowerPoint slides before class begins. The slides can be sent via email in advance of class.  

      Pre-arranged breaks accommodation:

      Students with disabilities might have the accommodation of pre-arranged breaks. The student is responsible for any work that is missed while on break.  

      Stand and sit at will accommodation:

      Students with disabilities might need to stand for a few minutes at certain points throughout the class. The instructor and the student should discuss the logistics of this accommodation prior to the course starting. The action by the student should cause as little interruption as possible. Having the student to sit at the back of the room would cause the least disturbance.  

      Preferential seating accommodation:

      The student has permission to sit at a designated place in the classroom (front, back, against the wall, visibility of the door etc.) The instructor should guarantee the designated seating for the student.      

      Enlargement of handouts/tests/quizzes:

      When the accommodation states the student's handouts/tests/quizzes should be enlarged to a certain font size, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make sure this is done. This can be done via the computer in most cases if the handouts are Word documents or PDFs.  

      Use of a four-function calculator in class and on exams and quizzes:

      Student with this accommodation are permitted to use a four-function (add, subtract, multiply, divide) calculator on any in-class work or exam that requires mathematical computation provided the exams or assignments are not designed to test the student’s ability to perform functions that the calculator performs.  

      Visual media:

      All visual media shown in class or through the Internet should be captioned.

      Exam accommodations

      Use of the Testing Center/Disability Services for testing:

      • The student will bring the instructor a Test Accommodation Form (TAF) to complete.
      • The student will take the TAF to the Testing Center to schedule their test or to Disability Services.
      • Disability Services tests students who need a reader, scribe or have mobility issues. All other students will test at the Testing Center.
      • Both the Testing Center and Disability Services will request the test from the instructor a week prior to the date scheduled for the exam by sending you a Test Request Form.  You must include the Test Request Form with the test when you send it to the proper testing site. The completed test will be returned to you by the method you checked on the Test Request Form.

      Additional comments for testing students with disabilities:

      1. Students with disabilities should be afforded the same respect and courtesy as all students and receive their tests back within the same time frame as all students. For example, if students in the classroom take a test on Wednesday and get the test back on Monday, the student with a disability should get the test back at the same time or at the next class period. The student with a disability will probably test on Tuesday or Thursday, so the test should be picked up from the ADA basket in the Evening Campus office as soon as possible, graded and handed back to the student. A solution to the logistics of picking up the test in a timely manner would be to have the Testing Center/Disability Services simply scan the test back to the instructor so the test can be graded immediately and returned to the student when the class meets again.
      2. The student with a disability and the instructor are to fill out the Test Accommodation Form together. The instructor should note the date and time the student has signed up to test and make sure the test is delivered to the Testing Center or Disability Services before the time the student is scheduled to test. The Testing Center/Disability Services should send the instructor a Test Request Form letting the instructor know the date/time of the test so there should be no reason why the test is not provided well ahead of when the student is scheduled to test.  
      3. If the instructor prefers to test their own students and not use the Testing Center/Disability Services, then you must make sure you are following the accommodations.  An example would be not to place a student in the hallway to test if they have minimal distraction as an accommodation. If the student is to get two hours, the instructor cannot tell the student to come at 4 p.m. to start the test and then join class lecture when they are done testing, causing them to miss out on the lecture given to the class. If the instructor is reviewing for a test, the instructor cannot ask the student with a disability to test while holding the class review because the instructor would rather the student test the same as other students instead of testing with Testing Services/Disability Services.  
      4. A student with disabilities cannot be forced to test when the class test if this interferes with the student getting the accommodation of extended time. Students' schedules will not always allow a student to test at the time the class is testing. If a student has a class before and after, they will not get their extended time, so they must be allowed to test at a different time.

      Extended time on tests/quizzes accommodation:

      Students are normally granted either x1.5 or x2 (double time). A student with x1.5 is given half of the time added on to the 50 minutes. In this example, the student would get a total of 75 minutes for the test.

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must discuss with the student how/where/when the test will be taken in order for the studentto receive the extended time.
      • The instructor must complete the TAF and return it back with the test to the correct testing site.
      • A student cannot be expected to miss class lectures or reviews to take a test.
      • If a student misses a test, the instructor must let the proctor site know it is OK for the student to reschedule the test.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student should arrange with the testing site the time they need to test for their proctored test.
      • The student must be cognizant of the times the testing site is open and make sure they have adequate time to complete the test within the operating hours.
      • The student must be on time for the test. If the student is late, the amount of time they are late should be subtracted from the start time.
      • If the student cannot take the test, they should contact the testing site to let them know as well as the instructor and get permission from the instructor to retake the test.

      Note: If the instructor increases the standard administration time for the entire class this must be taken into account before calculating the extended time for the student.  

      Testing in a minimal distraction environment:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must let the proctoring site know the student is to test with no more than three or four people in the room.
      • The arranged location must be free from distractions as much as possible.
      • The location should be in a room, not a hallway outside the classroom.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student must be on time, and if the student is not, the time they are late will be subtracted from the time designated for the test.

      Note: Sitting students in the back of a crowded classroom or asking the class to remain silent does not constitute a reduced distraction environment.  

      Oral testing:

      Students who qualify to be given their exams orally should be allowed to audibly say their answers to the instructor without writing or typing them. Given the one-on-one nature of this accommodation, a separate time and place should be established where the instructor can meet with the student and proctor the exam.

      Note: The Testing Policy for students with disabilities can be found on the Disability Services website or at the following link:  Disability Services Handbook 2012-2013   pg. 8-10 

      Other potential accommodations

      Alternative textbooks (CDs; PDFs) in accessible formats:

      • This accommodation is handled through Disability Services.
      • Students will use a screen reader to read the text to them.
      • There is a process the student must follow to receive the textbook in an alternate format. 

      Leniency of attendance:

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations that meet a student’s documented disability-related academic needs. Neither the college nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability. Each department identifies and defines the essential or fundamental academic requirements for its courses. Recognizing that faculty might have established strict, enforced policies regarding the number of absences that will be allowed before a student faces sanctions and that some students with disabilities have medically-related conditions of an episodic nature or other established reasons that their disability may make it difficult for them to fulfill the typical attendance requirements, Disability Services has established the following guidelines for considering/granting requests for leniency in classroom attendance policies.

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:
      • The student must request consideration of this policy at the beginning of each new semester/session from the coordinator of Disability Services.
      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for disability-related absences to the coordinator.
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the student (Day Campus and Evening Campus) or by the coordinator of Disability Services (Online Campus and Nationwide Campuses) at the start of each new semester/session. It is at this point the accommodation becomes effective.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when a disability-related absence will occur/has occurred and when necessary inform the instructor when he/she will return to class. If the student cannot reach the instructor, then the student should contact the coordinator. The coordinator will relay to the instructor information pertaining to the student.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation verifying the disability-related absence.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student would not need to see a doctor but could still be prevented from being/participating in class.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class, the college’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.
      • It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class will follow the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.
      • Both the instructor and student should understand the "leniency of attendance" accommodation provides relief from requirements for physical/virtual attendance in classes.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed during disability-necessitated absence.
      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:
      • Once the instructor is notified of the "leniency of attendance" accommodation, the instructor should have a private conversation or email with the student outlining the instructor’s expectation from the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor to ask for medical documentation when a student is absent due to their disability.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s absences from class threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and coordinator of Disability Services to review available options.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student might not need to see a doctor but can still be prevented from being/participating in class because of the disability.
      • The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on work missed.
      • Extension of deadlines for assignments due or arrangements for making up tests and exams missed during disability-related absences are NOT included in this assigned accommodation. This must be negotiated individually with the student as the need arises.
      • A suggested guideline when a student receives the "leniency of attendance" accommodation is to allow a 24-hour period to turn in any homework assignment that was due on the day of the absence. If an exam is missed, a general guideline would be to give the student a 24- to 48-hour window to make up the exam. It is recommended to work this out beforehand with the student so they understand the expectations of the instructor if such a flare-up or hospitalization should occur. The instructor should inform the student if they want documentation to verify the absence.
      • If a student misses more than two weeks of class because of the disability, it is reasonable to suggest to the student the option of withdrawing.
      • If the attendance becomes an issue closer to the end of class, an "Incomplete" would also be an option for the student.  

      Use of adaptive technology:

      Students who qualify for the use of adaptive technology such as portable CCTVs, screen readers, word processors, voice to text software, braille keypads, FM systems, etc., should be permitted to use this technology in the classroom and during exams unless otherwise noted on the LOA or unless it presents a health risk to the student or others. If an instructor is concerned about the use of adaptive technology in the classroom, they should contact Disability Services at (573) 875-7626.

      Spelling and grammar errors:

      Student with this accommodation should be given leniency for spelling and/or grammar errors on in-class assignments and exams provided the assignments and tests have not been designed to measure these skills.  

      Use of interpreters:

      Students who are hearing impaired can use interpreters in the classroom. The responsibility of obtaining the interpreters lies with Disability Services. As soon as Disability Services knows there will be a hearing-impaired student in the classroom, the instructor will be notified. A video on how to work with an interpreter in the classroom will be provided to the instructor.

      Temporary adjustments needed:

      Students will often get in accidents and need temporary assistance. This student is not a student with disabilities, so the instructor can provide whatever adjustments are needed for the time frame the student needs assistance. This does not have to be cleared through Disability Services.

      Training Guide on Implementing Accommodations Online Faculty

      Pursuant to federal laws and regulations postsecondary institutions must ensure that their policies or practices do not have the effect of discriminating against students with disabilities.

      The purpose of this training guide is to provide direction to instructor for implementing accommodations assigned to students in their courses. All students with disabilities participate in an extensive intake interview with the coordinator to determine "reasonable" accommodations based upon the functional limitations of their disability. Accommodations are arrived at on a case-by-case basis. In other words, one size does not fit all.  Accommodations go into effect once the instructor receives the Letter of Accommodation (LOA). Accommodations are not retroactive. If an instructor does not receive a LOA for a student, the accommodations are not to be given.

      Disability Services encourages self-advocacy by students with disabilities to communicate with the instructor about accommodations. However, if the LOA is provided to the instructor, it is the responsibility of the instructor to work with the student and provide the accommodation(s).  

      If you are in disagreement with the accommodation, this should be addressed with Disability Services, not the student. It can be construed as discriminatory if the instructor questions the accommodation the student is receiving and/or implies the need for the accommodation is not there. You must provide the accommodation until a resolution is reached, otherwise the college is placed at risk for a grievance being filed.  

      The potential accommodations below are by no means a comprehensive list of accommodations available through Disability Services. However, these accommodations tend to appear most frequently on LOAs issued and seem to elicit the most questions by faculty administrating them to our students.

      Enlargement of handouts/tests/quizzes:

      When the accommodation states the student's handouts/tests/quizzes should be enlarged to a certain font size, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make sure this is done. This can be done via the computer in most cases if the handouts are Word documents or PDFs.  

      Use of a four-function calculator in class and on exams and quizzes:

      Student with this accommodation are permitted to use a four-function (add, subtract, multiply, divide) calculator on any in-class work or exam that requires mathematical computation provided the exams or assignments are not designed to test the student’s ability to perform functions that the calculator performs.

      Extended time on tests/quizzes/homework:

      Students are normally granted either x1.5 or x2 (double time). A student with x1.5 is given half of the time added on to the 50 minutes. In this example, the student would get a total of 75 minutes for the test.

      Instructions for non-proctored tests/quizzes:

      If the student is taking the test at home and has extended time, it is the responsibility of the instructor to set up the extended time in D2L. This can be done by using the special access feature of D2L. It is highly recommended you do this as soon as you get the LOA from Disability Services for all tests and quizzes to eliminate any possibility of a student taking a test or quiz without their extended time. 

      Students need to know the standard time for the tests/quizzes for the class to ensure they are getting their extended time. Saying you forgot to extend the time is simply not acceptable and creates problems for the instructor, the student and the college.  

      Screen shots are provided below to help the instructor to set up the special access function in D2L.  

      1. In the "Edit quiz" window, click the "Restrictions" tab.
        step 1
      2. Click "Add Users to Special Access."
        step 2
      3. Check the box next to "Assign special time limit." Enter the time limit and check the "enforced" box.
        step 3
      4. In the bottom half of the window, check the box next to the student(s) you would like to give special access to and then click "Add Special Access."
        step 4
      5. Click Save and Close.  

      It should be noted that if homework is located in the quiz section of D2L and timed, then the student gets extended time for the homework the same as for the test/quiz. Note: If the instructor increases the standard administration time for the entire class, this must be taken into account before calculating the extended time for the student.  

      Instructions for proctored exams/quizzes:

      When online students have proctored testing, the instructor must notify the proctor of the accommodation and explain how the accommodation should be implemented.

      • Once the student fills out the proctor information and provides it to the instructor, the instructor should send the specific accommodation(s) to the proctor when the password is sent to the proctor.
      • The student should arrange their test time with the proctor and allow adequate time to complete the test within the operating hours of the site doing the proctoring.   

      Testing in a minimal distraction environment:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must let the proctoring site know the student is to test with no more than three or four people in the room.  If there are issues with arranging this, contact Disability Services for assistance.
      • The arranged location must be free from distractions as much as possible.
      • The location should be in a room not a hallway outside the classroom.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student must be on time and if the student is not, the time they are late will be subtracted from the start time designated for the test.

      Students who are testing in a computer lab must be assigned a different place to test. There should never be more than three or four people in the room.  

      Reader for exams and quizzes:

      • If a student is testing at a proctor site and requires a reader, a reader will be needed for the test/quiz.
      • The reader and student will need to talk, so a separate room should be provided.
      • If the terminology on the exam is difficult to pronounce, the instructor can read the test on a tape recorder for the scribe/student to use. The instructor can provide the copy of the test to the reader with pronunciation clarified for words that are difficult to pronounce. The reader can be given the test early so pronunciation of difficult words can be looked up.
      • Reader is to read the test only and repeat whenever asked by the student.
      • Readers are not permitted to explain questions or give any additional information that might provide an unfair advantage to the student unless the accommodation states otherwise.
      • The student may ask the instructor or designated proctor to rephrase a test question that is unclear providing the rephrasing does not compromise the intent of what the question is trying to measure if this is specifically stated on the LOA.  

      Scribe for exams and quizzes:

      • If a student needs someone to scribe for them and the student is testing at one of the campus sites, the proctor will need to scribe for the student.
      • The scribe and student will need to talk, so a separate room should be provided.
      • The scribe should write exactly what the student says. There should be no rewording or paraphrasing by the scribe.
      • If the test content is measuring punctuation or spelling, the student should provide the commas, periods, spelling, etc., to the scribe.  

      Oral exams:

      • Students who qualify to be given their exams orally should be allowed to audibly say their answers to the instructor without writing or typing them. Given the one-on-one nature of this accommodation, a separate time and place should be established where the instructor can meet with the student and proctor the exam. For online classes, the student would need to tape record the answers or a proctor would need to scribe for the student.  

      Alternative textbooks (CDs; PDFs) in accessible formats:

      • This accommodation is handled through Disability Services.
      • Students will use a screen reader to read the text to them.
      • There is a process the student must follow to receive the textbook in an alternate format.

      "Flexibility with deadlines" guidelines: 

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations that meet a student’s documented disability-related academic needs. Neither the college nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability. Recognizing that Online instructors are required to report attendance based on the students participation in the course each week, regardless of the disability, students qualifying for the "flexibility with deadlines" accommodation can be granted extensions for deadlines when the disability has prevented the student from being able to work on the assignment due to the flare-up. Students with disabilities who do not participate in the course during the week will be given an unexcused absence.  

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:
      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for the need for "flexibility with deadlines."
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the coordinator once the student registers for the new semester/session.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when they are in a flare-up condition.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation verifying from a medical professional they are in a flare-up state.
      • The student should understand the "flexibility with deadlines" accommodation provides relief from missed deadlines; however, it is at the discretion of the instructor if they want to extend the deadline or not.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed for the entire courses.
      • If the student asks for extensions for every assignment after the first two to three weeks of class, the student might want to consider withdrawing from the course. A student can get too far behind to be able to complete the course work on time.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class, the college’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.
      • It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class follows the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.
      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:
      • Once the instructor is notified of the "flexibility with deadlines" accommodation, the instructor should have a private conversation or email with the student outlining the instructor’s expectations for the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the instructor’s discretion to ask for medical documentation. It should be noted for certain disabilities the students might simply need bed rest and not need to see a doctor.
      • The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on work missed.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s request for extensions on deadlines threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of the learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and the coordinator to review possible options.
      • If the student asks for extensions for every assignment after the first two weeks of the class, the student might want to consider withdrawing from the course as they will get too far behind to be able to complete the course work on time.  
      Example of how to address the "flexibility with deadlines" accommodation:

      The example below is taken primarily from one instructor.  I received permission to share it with another instructor and have added the additional piece from that instructor for a combined example.

      Hello [student];  I wanted to touch base with you regarding the ADA accommodation for "flexibility with deadlines." I understand that your accommodation is to be allowed flexibility in submitting assignments when you are having a flare-up. My understanding from the Director of Disability Services, Melissa Hill, is that it is up to me to decide how to implement this accommodation. The following guidelines have been approved by Melissa, and find a "best practice" balance between course/grade integrity and the requested ADA accommodation.

      For all assignments, I would need notification before the deadline that you need an extension.

      For example, the Primary Post (see syllabus for definition) is due by Wednesday at midnight each week. I would need to be informed no later than Wednesday that you need an extension. If you are unable to notify me prior to the deadline that you need an extension, then you will need to provide a medical excuse for an extension after the fact. For your Primary Posts, I would allow an extension of two days maximum.  

      Secondary Comments (see syllabus for definition) to classmates' posts must be submitted on time — no later than the Saturday deadline. The reason for this is the dynamic nature of the Online course environment.  

      The Dropbox assignment will receive the same extension consideration as the Primary Post. I would need to be notified in advance that you need an extension. I will allow no more than two days for an extension. If it is not possible to notify me in advance, then you'll need to provide a medical excuse for an extension.

      • The weekly quizzes are available for students to take the entire week they are due. Additionally, I have added 1.5 or double time to your quiz times (depends on what the LOA states). An extension would be allowed only if a medical excuse is provided that covers the entire period the exam or quiz was available.  
      • Please keep in mind that course attendance is based on participation during the course week. Participation means that the student has submitted discussion posts or other assignments during a given course week. If a student doesn't participate in the course for a given week regardless of the reason, the student must be counted absent.
      • In closing, I look forward to your successful completion of the course material. The best way to ensure success is to work ahead. It is important for students to stay as up-to-date as possible on assignments so they don't fall behind. Juggling late work and current assignments can become difficult. Following are some things to consider regarding working ahead.
      • * Primary Posts: Using the course material in the syllabus, you already know all the assignments and all the Primary Post topics for the entire course. Those can all be completed immediately and then copied to the actual course website at the proper time.
      • * Secondary Comments: These are due by Saturday at midnight, but can be done at any time during the week.
      • * Weekly Quizzes: The quizzes for each week open at 1 a.m. Monday morning, and the student has until the following Sunday at midnight to complete the quiz. This is a full seven days to take each quiz.
      • * Dropbox — the term paper: I always encourage students to start their papers at the beginning of class. The term paper is not due until the end of the sixth week, but the student can write the paper in the first day if they want. The syllabus provides all the information needed to write the paper, along with a grading rubric at the end of the syllabus. I have also posted several helpful videos.  

      Use of adaptive technology:

      Students who qualify for the use of adaptive technology such as portable CCTVs, screen readers, word processors, voice to text software, braille keypads, FM systems, etc., should be permitted to use this technology in the classroom and during exams unless otherwise noted on the LOA or unless it presents a health risk to the student or others. If an instructor is concerned about the use of adaptive technology in the classroom, they should contact Disability Services at (573) 875-7626.

      Spelling and grammar errors:

      Student with this accommodation should be given leniency for spelling and/or grammar errors on in-class assignments and exams provided the assignments and tests have not been designed to measure these skills.  

      Temporary adjustments Needed:

      Students will often get in accidents and need temporary assistance. This student is not a student with disabilities, so the instructor can provide whatever adjustments are needed for the time frame the student needs assistance. This does not have to be cleared through Disability Services.  

      Visual media:

      All visual media shown in class or through the Internet should be captioned.

      Training Guide on Implementing Accommodations Nationwide Faculty

      Pursuant to federal laws and regulations, postsecondary institutions must ensure that their policies or practices do not have the effect of discriminating against students with disabilities.

      The purpose of this training guide is to provide direction to instructors on implementing accommodations assigned to students in their courses. All students with disabilities participate in an extensive intake interview with the coordinator to determine "reasonable" accommodations based upon the functional limitations of their disability. Accommodations are arrived at on a case-by-case basis. In other words, one size does not fit all.  Accommodations go into effect once the instructor receives the Letter of Accommodation (LOA). Accommodations are not retroactive. If an instructor does not receive a LOA for a student the accommodations are not to be given.   

      Disability Services encourages self-advocacy by students with disabilities to communicate with the instructor about accommodations. However, if the LOA is provided to the instructor it is the responsibility of the instructor to work with the student and provide the accommodation(s).  

      If you are in disagreement with the accommodation, this should be addressed with Disability Services, not the student. It can be construed as discriminatory if the instructor questions the accommodation the student is receiving and/or implies the need for the accommodation is not there. You must go ahead and provide the accommodation until a resolution is reached, otherwise the college is placed at risk for a grievance being filed.

      The potential accommodations below are by no means a comprehensive list of accommodations available through Disability Services. However, these accommodations tend to appear most frequently on LOAs issued and seem to elicit the most questions by faculty administrating them to our students.    

      Classroom Accommodations

      Note-taking accommodation:

      Instructor responsibilities :
      • On the first day of class, the instructor should ask for a student volunteer to take notes. The name of the student they are requesting a note-taker for should not be revealed to the class.
      • The instructor and the note-taker should make arrangements on the copying and exchanging of notes.
      • The instructor is to arrange with the student a time and place to pick up the notes.
      • If a note-taker cannot be found, the instructor can fulfill this accommodation by providing their own notes to the student.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to ask the student if it is OK to reveal their identity to the note-taker and then have the student and note-taker work out the exchanging of the notes.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to provide PowerPoint slides to the student, but the best practice would be to visit with the student to make sure this is sufficient for the notes. If so, a note-taker will not be needed as the slides would serve as the notes.  
      Note-takers responsibilities:
      • Writing legibly, using paper and pen that reproduces well on a standard copier.
      • Label each days notes with title and section of the class, date and page number.
      • Deliver the notes to the instructor at the end of each class session.
      • The student should contact the instructor if they are going to be absent from class.
      Student responsibilities:
      • Inform the instructor of the need for a note-taker as indicated in the LOA from Disability Services.
      • Work out a system with the instructor for picking up notes.
      • Be aware that if you are not in class you are not eligible for the notes that day.  
      Other option for note-taking:
      • Have the note-taker use a laptop to take notes and share them electronically with the instructor, who will then give the notes to the student.  

      Tape recording accommodation:

      An instructor may not forbid a student’s use of an aid if that prohibition limits the student’s participation in the school program. In accordance with subpart E of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, "a recipient may not impose upon handicapped students other rules, such as prohibition of tape recorders in classroom or of guide dogs in campus buildings that have the effect of limiting the participation of handicapped students in the recipient’s education program or activity."

      In order to allow a student the use of an effective aid and, at the same time, protect the instructor, the institution requires the student to sign an agreement so as not to infringe on a potential copyright or to limit freedom of speech.

      From the Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. http://www.2/ed/gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html   

      Instructor responsibility with tape recording:
      • The instructor has the right to ask the student not to record if the class discussion is of a personal nature. 
      Student responsibilities with tape recording:
      • Recording of the class lectures are only for the student’s personal use in study and preparation related to the course.
      • The student may not share their recordings with any other person, whether or not that person is in his/her class.
      • The student acknowledges the recordings are sources, the use of which in any academic works is governed by rules of academic conduct for the college.
      • The student will destroy any recordings that were made when they are no longer needed for his/her academic work.
      • Failure on the student’s part to abide by these provisions may result in loss of permission to audio record class lectures.  

      Use of computer for in-class assignments:

      Students who have LOAs with the accommodation of using a word processor for in-class assignments should be permitted to use a laptop to type a writing assignment done in class.  Because these students might not have direct access to an in-room printer, they should be permitted to email the instructor the file at the end of the class or print it and hand it in at a later time. Note: If any assignments or homework are timed and the student has the accommodation of extended time, then the student must be given the time allocated for tests/quizzes to complete their assignments and homework.  

      Access to PowerPoint and overheads before class begins:

      These students should be given print-out copies of the day’s PowerPoint slides before class begins. The slides can be sent via email in advance of class.  

      Pre-arranged breaks accommodation:

      Students might have the accommodation of pre-arranged breaks. The student is responsible for any work that is missed while on break.  

      Stand and sit at will accommodation:

      Students might need to stand for a few minutes at certain points throughout the class. The instructor and the student should discuss the logistics of this accommodation prior to the course starting. The action by the student should cause as little interruption as possible. Having the student to sit at the back of the room would cause the least disturbance.  

      Preferential seating accommodation: 

      Student has permission to sit at a designated place in the classroom (front, back, against the wall, visibility of the door, etc.) The instructor should guarantee the designated seating for the student. 

      Enlargement of handouts/tests/quizzes:

      When the accommodation states the students handouts/tests/quizzes should be enlarged to a certain font size, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make sure this is done. This can be done via the computer in most cases if the handouts are Word documents or PDFs.  

      Use of a four-function calculator in class and on exams and quizzes:

      Students with this accommodation are permitted to use a four-function (add, subtract, multiply, divide) calculator on any in-class work or exam that requires mathematical computation provided the exams or assignments are not designed to test the student’s ability to perform functions that the calculator performs.

      Visual media:

      All visual media shown in class or through the Internet should be captioned

      Exam accommodations

      Note-taking accommodation:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • On the first day of class, the instructor should ask for a student volunteer to take notes. The name of the student they are requesting a note-taker for should not be revealed to the class.
      • The instructor and the note-taker should make arrangements on the copying and exchanging of notes.
      • The instructor is to arrange with the student a time and place to pick up the notes.
      • If a note-taker cannot be found, the instructor can fulfill this accommodation by providing their own notes to the student.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to ask the student if it is OK to reveal their identity to the note-taker and then have the student and note-taker work out the exchanging of the notes.
      • It is permissible for the instructor to provide PowerPoint slides to the student, but the best practice would be to visit with the student to make sure this is sufficient for the notes. If so, a note-taker will not be needed as the slides would serve as the notes.
      Note-takers responsibilities include:
    7. Writing legibly, using paper and pen that reproduces well on a standard copier.
    8. Label each days notes with title and section of the class, date and page number.
    9. Deliver the notes to the instructor at the end of each class session.
    10. The student should contact the instructor if they are going to be absent from class.
    11. Student responsibilities:
      • Inform the instructor of the need for a note-taker as indicated in the LOA from Disability Services.
      • Work out a system with the instructor for picking up notes.
      • Be aware that if you are not in class you are not eligible for the notes that day.
      Other option for note-taking:
      • Have the note-taker use a laptop to take notes and share them electronically with the instructor, who will then give the notes to the student.

      Tape recording accommodation:

      An instructor may not forbid a student’s use of an aid if that prohibition limits the student’s participation in the school program. In accordance with subpart E of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, "a recipient may not impose upon handicapped students other rules, such as prohibition of tape recorders in classroom or of guide dogs in campus buildings that have the effect of limiting the participation of handicapped students in the recipient’s education program or activity."

      In order to allow a SWD the use of an effective aid and, at the same time, protect the instructor, the institution requires the student to sign an agreement so as not to infringe on a potential copyright or to limit freedom of speech.  

      From the Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. http://www.2/ed/gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

      Instructor responsibility with tape recording:
      • The instructor has the right to ask the student not to record if the class discussion is of a personal nature.
      Student responsibilities with tape recording:
      • Recording of the class lectures are only for the student’s personal use in study and preparation related to the course.
      • The student may not share their recordings with any other person, whether or not that person is in his/her class.
      • The student acknowledges the recordings are sources, the use of which in any academic works is governed by rules of academic conduct for the college.
      • The student will destroy any recordings that were made when they are no longer needed for his/her academic work.
      • Failure on the student’s part to abide by these provisions might result in loss of permission to audio tape/audio record class lectures.  

      Use of computer for in-class assignments:

      Students who have LOAs with the accommodation of using a word processor for in-class assignments should be permitted to use a laptop to type a writing assignment done in class.  Because these students might not have direct access to an in-room printer, they should be permitted to email the instructor the file at the end of the class or print it and hand it in at a later time.

      Note:If any assignments or homework are timed and the student has the accommodation of extended time, then the student must be given the time allocated for tests/quizzes to complete their assignments and homework.  

      Access to PowerPoint and overheads before class begins:

      These students should be given print-out copies of the day’s PowerPoint slides before class begins. The slides can be sent via email in advance of class.  

      Pre-arranged breaks accommodation:

      Students might have the accommodation of pre-arranged breaks. The student is responsible for any work that is missed while on break.  

      Stand and sit at will accommodation:

      Students might need to stand for a few minutes at certain points throughout the class. The instructor and the student should discuss the logistics of this accommodation prior to the course starting. The action by the student should cause as little interruption as possible.  Having the student to sit at the back of the room would cause the least disturbance.  

      Preferential seating accommodation:

      The student has permission to sit at a designated place in the classroom (front, back, against the wall, visibility of the door, etc.) The instructor should guarantee the designated seating for the student.  

      Enlargement of handouts/tests/quizzes:

      When the accommodation states the student's handouts/tests/quizzes should be enlarged to a certain font size, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make sure this is done. This can be done via the computer in most cases if the handouts are Word documents or PDFs.  

      Use of a four-function calculator in class and on exams and quizzes:

      Students with this accommodation are permitted to use a four-function (add, subtract, multiply, divide) calculator on any in-class work or exam that requires mathematical computation provided the exams or assignments are not designed to test the student’s ability to perform functions that the calculator performs.   

      Visual media:

      All visual media shown in class or through the Internet should be captioned.    

      Exam accommodations

      Extended time on tests/quizzes accommodation:

      Students are normally granted either x1.5 or x2 (double time). A student with x1.5 is given half of the time added on to the 50 minutes. In this example, the student would get a total of 75 minutes for the test.

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must discuss with the student how/where/when the test will be taken in order for the student to receive the extended time.
      • The instructor must let the proctor know the student has extended time and how much time when the test is sent to the proctor.
      • The instructor should let the proctor know when and how the test will be delivered to the proctor and how the instructor would like the test delivered back to the instructor for grading.
      • Students are to receive their graded test back in the same time frame as all students.
      • Students cannot be expected to miss class lectures or reviews to take the test.
      • If a student misses a test, the instructor must let the proctor site know it is OK for the student to reschedule the test.
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student should arrange with the testing site the time they need to test for their proctored test.
      • The student must be cognizant of the times the testing site is open and make sure they have adequate time to complete the test within the operating hours.
      • The student must be on time for the test. If the student is late, the amount of time they are late should be subtracted from the start time.
      • If the student cannot take the test, they should contact the testing site to let them know as well as the instructor and get permission from the instructor to retake the test.

      Note: If the instructor increases the standard administration time for the entire class this must be taken into account before calculating the extended time for the student with disabilities.  

      Testing in a minimal distraction environment:

      Instructor responsibilities:
      • The instructor must let the proctoring site know the student is to test with no more than three or four people in the room.
      • The arranged location must be as free from distractions as possible.
      • The location should be in a room, not a hallway outside the classroom.  
      Student responsibilities:
      • The student must be on time; if the student is not, the time they are late will be subtracted from the time designated for the test.

      Note: Sitting students in the back of a crowded classroom or asking the class to remain silent does not constitute a reduced distraction environment.  

      Reader for exams and quizzes:

      • An appropriate reader for a student would be the instructor or designated staff member.
      • The reader and student will need to talk, so a separate room should be provided.
      • If the terminology on the exam is difficult to pronounce, the instructor can read the test on a tape recorder for the reader/student to use. The instructor can provide the copy of the test to the reader with pronunciation clarified for words that are difficult to pronounce. The reader can be given the test early so pronunciation of difficult words can be looked up.
      • Reader is to read the test only and repeat whenever asked by the student.
      • Readers are not permitted to explain questions or give any additional information that may provide an unfair advantage to the student unless the accommodation states otherwise.
      • The student may ask the instructor or designated proctor to rephrase a test question that is unclear providing the rephrasing does not compromise the intent of what the question is trying to measure if this is specifically stated on the LOA.  

      Scribe for exams and quizzes:

      • An appropriate scribe for a student would be the instructor or designated staff member.
      • The scribe and student will need to talk, so a separate room should be provided.
      • The scribe should write exactly what the student says. There should be no rewording or paraphrasing back on the paper what the student has said.
      • If the test content is measuring punctuation or spelling, the student should provide the commas, periods, spelling, etc., to the scribe.  

      Oral testing:

      • Students who qualify to be given their exams orally should be allowed to audibly say their answers to the instructor without writing or typing them. Given the one-on-one nature of this accommodation, a separate time and place should be established where the instructor can meet with the student and proctor the exam.    

      Other potential accommodations

      Alternative textbooks (CDs; PDFs) in accessible formats:

      • This accommodation is handled through Disability Services.
      • Students will use a screen reader to read the text to them.
      • There is a process the student must follow to receive the textbook in an alternate format. 

      Leniency of attendance:

      Columbia College makes every effort to provide reasonable accommodations that meet a student’s documented disability-related academic needs. Neither the college nor an individual faculty member is required to waive an essential or fundamental academic requirement of a course, regardless of the nature of the student’s disability. Each department identifies and defines the essential or fundamental academic requirements for its courses. Recognizing that faculty might have established strict, enforced policies regarding the number of absences that will be allowed before a student faces sanctions and that some students with disabilities have medically-related conditions of an episodic nature or other established reasons that their disability might make it difficult for them to fulfill the typical attendance requirements, Disability Services has established the following guidelines for considering/granting requests for leniency in classroom attendance policies.

      What a student needs to understand about this accommodation:
      • The student must request consideration of this policy at the beginning of each new semester/session from the coordinator of Disability Services.
      • The student will provide documentation validating the request for disability-related absences to the coordinator.
      • The Letter of Accommodation will be provided to the instructor by the student (Day Campus and Evening Campus) or by the coordinator of Disability Services (Online Campus and Nationwide Campuses) at the start of each new semester/session. It is at this point the accommodation becomes effective.
      • The student is responsible for contacting the instructor as soon as possible when a disability-related absence will occur/has occurred and, when necessary, inform the instructor when he/she will return to class. If the student cannot reach the instructor then the student should contact the coordinator. The coordinator will relay to the instructor information pertaining to the student.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor if the student should provide documentation verifying the disability-related absence.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student would not need to see a doctor but could still be prevented from being/participating in class.
      • If the student needs to withdraw from the class, the college’s withdrawal procedure should be followed.
      • It should be noted that a student with a disability who withdraws from a class will follow the same financial aid guidelines as any other student regardless of the disability.
      • Both the instructor and student should understand the "leniency of attendance" accommodation provides relief from requirements for physical/virtual attendance in classes.
      • The student is responsible for all materials covered or work completed during disability-necessitated absence.
      What an instructor should understand about this accommodation:
      • Once the instructor is notified of the "leniency of attendance" accommodation. the instructor should have a private conversation or email with the student outlining the instructor’s expectations of the student in implementing this accommodation.
      • It is at the discretion of the instructor to ask for medical documentation when a student is absent due to their disability.
      • If at any time the instructor believes the student’s absences from class threatens the academic integrity of the curriculum or the accomplishment of learning objectives, the instructor should notify the student and coordinator of Disability Services to review available options.
      • It should be noted for certain disabilities the student might not need to see a doctor but can still be prevented from being/participating in class because of the disability.
      •  The instructor is not responsible to keep the student current on work missed.
      • Extension of deadlines for assignments due or arrangements for making up tests and exams missed during disability-related absences are NOT included in this assigned accommodation. This must be negotiated individually with the student as the need arises.
      • A suggested guideline when a student receives the "leniency of attendance" accommodation is to allow a 24-hour period to turn in any homework assignment that was due on the day of the absence. If an exam is missed, a general guideline would be to give the student a 24- to 48-hour window to make up the exam. It is recommended to work this out beforehand with the student so they understand the expectations of the instructor if such a flare-up or hospitalization should occur. The instructor should inform the student if they want documentation to verify the absence.
      • If a student misses more than two weeks of class because of the disability, it is reasonable to suggest to the student the option of withdrawing.
      • If the attendance becomes an issue closer to the end of class, an "Incomplete" would also be an option for the student .  

      Use of adaptive technology:

      Students who qualify for the use of adaptive technology such as portable CCTVs, screen readers, word processors, voice to text software, braille keypads, FM systems, etc., should be permitted to use this technology in the classroom and during exams unless otherwise noted on the LOA or unless it presents a health risk to the student or others. If an instructor is concerned about the use of adaptive technology in the classroom, they should contact Disability Services at (573) 875-7626. 

      Spelling and grammar errors:

      Student with this accommodation should be given leniency for spelling and/or grammar errors on in-class assignments and exams provided the assignments and tests have not been designed to measure these skills.  

      Use of interpreters:

      Students who are hearing impaired can use interpreters in the classroom. The responsibility of obtaining the interpreters lies with Disability Services. As soon as Disability Services knows there will be a hearing-impaired student in the classroom, the instructor will be notified. A video on how to work with an interpreter in the classroom will be provided to the instructor.   

      Temporary adjustments needed:

      Students will often get in accidents and need temporary assistance. This student is not a student with disabilities, so the instructor can provide whatever adjustments are needed for the time frame the student needs assistance. This does not have to be cleared through Disability Services.

      When Faculty Are TOO Accommodating!

      By Jane E. Jarrow, Ph.D. 

      Most faculty members in higher education today understand the legal and educational imperatives that mandate equal access to students with disabilities through academic accommodation. Sometimes, though, problems arise from faculty who are readily prepared to provide appropriate accommodation — it is their accommodating natures that can get them, the institution and (sometimes) the student in trouble!  

      Most institutions have established a clearly articulated policy as to who holds the documentation of disability, what steps a student must take to declare their need for disability-related accommodations and how that information is communicated to faculty. But what of the student who says, "I don’t want to go through the disability services office. I want to advocate for myself and work directly with faculty and negotiate my own accommodations." Regardless of why students choose to go this independent route (and there are both good and bad reasons for taking such a stance), the faculty member who agrees to disregard institutional policy and honor an accommodation request directly from the student might not be doing anyone a favor!  

      Personal Jeopardy:  Faculty members who work directly with students and discuss the disability, (possibly) look over the documentation and agree to accommodation might be establishing themselves as the "gatekeepers" without meaning to do so. If the faculty member agrees to provide accommodation "X" and not accommodation "Y," and later the student maintains that he/she was not appropriately accommodated, it is the faculty member’s decision that is subject to question, and it is the faculty member who could conceivably be held responsible for violating this student’s civil rights. The faculty member who agrees to provide accommodations without institutional authorization for a student with a disability (for example, ADD) and sends that student back through channels for official documentation could be opening himself/herself up for charges of discrimination, intimidation or harassment. Faculty members who conscientiously try to make life easier for the student by allowing the student to bring the documentation directly to them might gain access to confidential information to which they should not be privy. For all these reasons, it would be best for faculty not to be drawn into the collection of disability documentation or the decision-making regarding accommodation.  

      Institutional Jeopardy:  The student who provides documentation to a single faculty member (who accepts and acts on that documentation) might be able to make a legitimate case for saying he/she informed the institution of the disability and the need for accommodation. The faculty member should not be discussing the information that has been shared (because of issues of privacy and confidentiality), and yet the student might be expecting to receive similar consideration and accommodation from other faculty on the basis of having provided the documentation to someone in authority at the institution. If it is not made clear that the institution has not been "notified" until the documentation is provided and requests are made from such-and-such an office, the institution might not be in a position to defend itself from charges of discrimination by neglect for a student who does not receive accommodation by others within the institution. 

      Or consider this scenario: Professor A accepts the documentation and provides accommodation without going through channels, as do Professors B and C, and then Professor D says, "I will provide accommodations when I receive proper notification from the disability services office that this is appropriate." Professor D looks like the villain for following the rules! More distressing, however, is the possibility that the institution might be facing some very real difficulties if the disability services office determines that some of the accommodations that Professors A, B and C provided were not warranted by the documentation and does not prescribe those same accommodations for Professor D to provide.

      Student Jeopardy:  Students with disabilities will still have those disabilities after they leave the postsecondary environment. Whether they choose to go on to graduate or professional school or seek a place in the world of work, chances are that if they need accommodations to successfully function in higher education, they might need accommodations in their future endeavors as well. More and more often, those settings beyond the postsecondary experience are ready and willing to provide accommodations on the basis of verification from the higher postsecondary institution that those same accommodations have been provided during the student’s postsecondary career. If the student has no record of having been served by the institution — if the student was never on file in the disability services office and received all of his/her accommodations through individual discussion with faculty — that student will have no official history of being regarded or served as a person with a disability and might have a much more difficult time establishing the claim to accommodation in the future.

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